Federico: Kingman Turquoise Flower Love Bird Earrings

$430.00

Style Number: F-62618-3-2 Categories: , , , Tags: ,

1 Available

Kingman Turquoise Flower Love Bird Earrings

Kingman Turquoise Flower Love Bird Earrings made by the world renown artist Federico. This stunning pair of earrings feature sterling silver flower post and two love birds dangle with 3 pieces of kingman turquoise. The earrings are 3 1/2″ inches long by 1 1/2″ inches wide.

Kingman Turquoise

Kingman Turquoise originates in the Mineral Park Mining District near Kingman, Arizona. One of the largest domestic turquoise mines, it is found in a large open pit copper mine in the high desert country. The Kingman Mine district was first mined by Native Americans; it was part of the most extensive prehistoric workings in Arizona.

However, modern production of turquoise dates back to the 1880’s when James Haas rediscovered the area. Natural Kingman Turquoise ranges in color from light to very dark blue and sometimes tints of green. Matrix can range from white, light brown to black and frequently flecked with pyrite and occasionally quartz. The most famous stones from this mine are rounded bright blue nuggets with black matrix. Few turquoise mines produced nuggets, especially of this quality. In its high-grade form it has always been considered among the top quality American turquoise. This high blue color has become a “color standard” in the industry, reflected by the name “Kingman Blue”. However, much of the turquoise from Kingman occurs as seams, masses and veins, rather then in nugget form. Besides the nugget form, the most desirable Kingman turquoise is a deep blue with molybdenum pyrite; also, deep blue with pyrite as well as in a “bird’s eye” pattern with “water web” matrix.

The mine is currently owned & Operated by the Colbaugh family’s company, Colbaugh Processing. While old natural Kingman turquoise is rare, they have recently gone back into older sections of the Kingman mine and are bringing out some new natural Kingman Turquoise. Although there are quantities of this fine natural deep blue turquoise available, the largest percentage of turquoise mined at Kingman is being treated or stabilized. There are several other names for the turquoise coming out of the Kingman mining district: Ithaca Peak, Old Man Mine, Kingman Duval, Courtland, The Wall and Turquoise Mountain, just to mention a few.

International Artist: Federico

FedericoFederico Jimenez was born in Oaxaca, Mexico in 1941 in a Mixtec Indian Community.

Federico comes from the tiny village of Tututepec, Mexico. When he was 12 years old he accidentally set fire to a nativity set in his village. His family was pressured into sending him to live in the city of Oaxaca. He returned to Tututepec in his late teens. He and his Father discovered a big pot when they were repairing the foundation of their home. Inside was a pre-Columbian Mixtec Indian pectoral (a chest ornament) with strands of gold, turquoise and shell that had been secretly buried by his family. Later when he worked for the Anthropological Museum he learned that the village had once been the kingdom of the Mixtecs and his great-grandfather had probably been their chief. 

 During his years in Oaxaca he developed an appreciation for antiques from a girlfriend whose family were avid collectors. After finding the pectoral he became interested in collecting antiques and started going village-to-village searching and collecting jewelry and Indian costumes.A few years later he met his future wife who was with a group of American anthropologists. She said, “If you love me, you’ll follow me”. So he followed her to Los Angeles where he hit all the big swap meets, buying, selling, trading and building his inventory. He also built up a private collection of Mexican jewelry that he claims is the world’s largest as it incorporates pieces from contemporary, colonial and pre-Columbian periods. He organizes exhibitions and acquires items for UCLA’s Museum of Cultural History and the National Folk Art Museum in Santa Fe. He displays many pieces of his jewelry in the Anthropological Museum in Mexico City. Federico designs and produces jewelry in Los Angeles.